Validity

Validity

Presented by:

Anisa Rahmadhani
Ahmad Rizky Septiadi
Irfan Rinaldi Bimantara
Lydia Anggraini
Norlaila Hayani

Defination of Validity

A test is valid if it measures accurately what it is intended to measure.

Types of Validity

  • Content Validity
  • Criterion-related Validity
  • Construct Validity
  • Validity in Scoring
  • Face Validity

1. Content Validity

  • The test content is a representative sample of the language skills being tested.
  • The test is content valid if it includes a proper sample.

Importance of content validity:

  • The greater a test’s content validity, the more likely its construct validity.
  • A test without content validity is likely to have a harmful backwash effect since areas that are not tested are likely to become ignored in teaching and learning.

2. Criterion-related Validity
To degree to which result on the test agree with those provided by an independent criterion.

Kinds of criterion-related Validity
Concurrent Validity
is establised when the test and the criterion are administered at the same time.

Predictive Validity

  • Concerns the degree to which a test can predict candidates’ future performance.
  • Areas that are not tested are likely to become ignored in teaching and learning.

3. Construct Validity
The degree to which a test measures what it claims, or purports, to be measuring.

Construct: A construct is an attribute, an ability, or skill that happens in the human brain and is defined by established theories.

  • Intelligence, motivation, anxiety, proficiency, and fear are all examples of constructs.
  • They exist in theory and has been observed to exist in practice.
  • Constructs exist in the human brain and are not directly observable.
  • There are two types of construct validity : convergent and discriminant validity. Construct validity is establised by looking at numerous studies that use the test being evaluated.

4. Validity in Scoring

  • A reading test may call for short written responses.
  • If the scoring of these responses takes into account spelling and grammar, then it is not valid in scoring.

5. Face Validity

  • The way the test looks the examinees, test administrator, educators, and the like.
  • If you want to test the student in pronunciation, but you do not ask them to speak, your test lacks face validity.
  • If your test contain items or materials which are not acceptable to candidates, teachers, educators, etc., your test lacks face validity.

How to Make Tests More Valid?

  • Write explicit specifications for the test, which include all the construct to be measured.
  • Make sure that you include a representative sample of the content.
  • Use direct testing.
  • Make sure the scoring is valid.
  • Make the test reliable.

 

Download Slide PowerPoint version: Validity

Note: This material can be the result of students’ summarizing, paraphrasing etc. from references, mainly from Hughes, A. (2003). Testing for Language Teachers (2nd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. The book was main book used by the students for the need of discussion in English Learning Assessment class in State Islamic Institute of Palangka Raya.

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